NZNOG 2010 Conference
28, 29 January 2010

Waikato University
Hamilton

Thursday 28 January
Speaker
Welcome

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Planning the New Zealand Web Harvest 2010

Gordon Paynter - Digitisation Programme Manager, National Library of New Zealand

Abstract:

The National Library of New Zealand has a social responsibility to preserve New Zealand's social and cultural history, be it in the form of books, newspapers and photographs, or of websites, blogs and videos. In recognition of the increasingly central role of the internet in all areas of life, the Library undertook a large-scale web harvest over a period of ten days in October 2008, eventually collecting 4 terabytes of data from over 100 million URLs. We are pleased with the result of the 2008 harvest, but acknowledge some problems with its execution. A second harvest is planned for April 2010, and we are currently asking technical and networking stakeholders for feedback on potential approaches to notification, robots policy, and the location of the harvester. This feedback will be built into the planning of the harvest, its public notification, and the harvest itself in April.

Bio:

Dr. Gordon W. Paynter is the Digitisation Programme Manager and a Senior Application Developer at the National Library of New Zealand. He earned a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Waikato in New Zealand, then worked for the New Zealand Digital Library Project and the University of California. He was the project manager for the New Zealand Web Harvest 2008, and currently works on digitisation and web archiving.

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WAND Group Updates 

Abstract:

Updates on various projects will be provided, such as;

  • The new interface to AMP (as proposed on the NZNOG list)
  • IPv6 PMTUD testing
  • Network Anomaly detection


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What will you do when the vacuum cleaner turns into a sucker truck?

Shane Hobson, Velocity Networks

Abstract:

This isn't an indepth technical discussion, but is intended to provoke ISPs into thinking about their reaction to future broadband developments as users move from 250 kbps ADSL to 100 mbps FTTP. This is intended to be an interactive session, so bring along your own ideas to share.

Bio :

Shane has been building open access networks for over a decade. Starting with his own wireless access (non-ISP) network around the Waikato, this was sold to Wired Country where Shane spent two years during the start up phase of the business prior to it's sale to Compass. His past four years have been spent at Velocity building the Hamilton fibre network.

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The Emergence of the Video Internet Peering Ecosystem

William B. Norton - Founder, DrPeering.net

Abstract:

In this brief we share some initial insights into the migration of video traffic from traditional channels into what can best be described as an emerging Video Internet Ecosystem.

Bio:

Mr Norton is Founder of DrPeering.net, an Internet Peering portal and consultancy, with over twenty years of Internet experience.

From 1998-2008, Mr. Norton’s title was Co-Founder and Chief Technical Liaison for Equinix. From the beginning, Mr. Norton focused on building a critical mass of carriers, ISPs and Content Providers. To this end, he created the white paper process, identifying interesting and important Internet peering operations topics, and documenting what he learned from the peering folks. He published and presented his research white papers in a variety of international operations and research forums.  These activities helped establish the relationships necessary to atract the set of Tier 1 ISPs, Tier 2 ISPs, Cable Companies, and Content Providers necessary for a healthy Internet Exchange Point ecosystem.

From 1995-1998 Mr. Norton chaired the North American Network Operator's Group (NANOG), and he created the business plan for taking NANOG commercial.

From October 1987 to September 1998, Mr. Norton served in a variety of staff and managerial roles at Merit Network, Inc., including directing national and international network research and operations activities.

Mr. Norton received a B.A. in computer Science and an M.B.A. from the Michigan Business School.

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The next three years.  What are ISPs that want to continue to grow going to do?

Philip Smith - CTO Consulting Engineer, Cisco

Abstract:

IPv6, IPv4 run-out, 4-byte ASNs.  This talk looks at what ISPs are going to have to do over the coming three years if they want to continue growing.

Bio:

Philip Smith has been with Cisco Systems since 1998.  He is part of the Internet Infrastructure Group in CTO Consulting Engineering.  His role includes working with the ISPs and Service Provider operations groups around the world, specifically in network design, configuration, scaling and training. Prior to joining Cisco, he spent five years at PIPEX (now part of UUNET's global ISP business), the UK's first commercial Internet Service Provider.  He was one of the first engineers working in the commercial Internet in the UK, and played a key role in building the modern Internet in Europe.

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Do your fruit hang low?

Adam Boileau - VP of Bit Banging, Kiwicon



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New Zealand Internet Task Force

Paul McKitrick

Abstract:

The New Zealand Internet Task Force, NZITF, is a collaborative approach to mitigating emerging threats on the Internet.  It is a collection of 30+ organisations, and individuals across the IT Industry, Security Community, Government, Law Enforcement, Telecommunications Companies and Universities.

This talk will discuss some recent activity and projects undertaken by members of the NZITF to give you some idea of what it is, who we are and what we do, and most importantly how you can potentially get involved. 

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How to build a router in these tough and difficult economic times.

Jamie Curtis, Perry Lorier - WAND Network Research Group

Abstract:

Have your six figure purchasing budgets all dried up? These tough economic times have taken their tolls on us all. Traditional routers are stupidly expensive, but what if there was an alternative option that is much cheaper but just as effective? Modern hardware architectures are now powerful enough and open-source software is flexible enough that it is possible to create a viable router for a lot less money than the standard vendor solutions. In this talk, we will present the results of experiments where we have used a commodity server (total cost less than $15K) running Linux to route through multiple 10 Gbps interfaces. We have tested the performance under a number of common scenarios faced by ISPs, including switching, routing, firewalling and LNS.

Bio:

Jamie & Perry are stubbornly trying to avoid ever getting out into the "real world". As academics they love the alternative lifestyle (networking-wise, of course) and are strong proponents of free and open-source solutions to practical problems. One of them may also be a bear. They have had a long association with NZNOG and have regularly presented at previous NZNOG conferences.

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Secure BGP

Geoff Huston - Chief Scientist, APNIC

Abstract:

There are two forms of attack that do not require any compromise of a host system - they relate to attacks on the DNS and attacks on routing. This talk explores the implications of the current levels of vulnerability in the inter-domain routing system, and takes an operational perspective on the various measures that can be used to improve this situation.

Bio:

Geoff Huston is the Chief Scientist at the Asia Pacific Network Information Centre (APNIC), where he undertakes research on topics associated with Internet infrastructure, IP technologies, and address distribution policies.

Widely regarded as the preeminent researcher on IPv4 exhaustion, he is routinely referenced by international agencies and is frequently quoted by the ICT media.

Geoff has also presented at a number of global technical and government forums, including the OECD, ITU, ICANN, APEC, and the IETF.

Prior to APNIC, Geoff was employed as the Chief Internet Scientist at Telstra and Technical Manager of the Australian Academic and Research Network (AARNET). He was a leading figure in the development of Australia’s academic and commercial Internet services.

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ISP Scenarios for IPv6 Deployment

Brian E. Carpenter - Professor, Auckland University

Abstract:

Since the IETF first considered deployment scenarios, the original expectation that IPv6 would deploy before IPv4 ran out has proved wrong. This talk will discuss what the IETF is doing now and will ask for input to help this work.

Bio:

Brian E. Carpenter joined the University of Auckland in September 2007 and was appointed Professor in January 2009. Before that, he spent ten years with IBM at various locations, working on Internet standards and technology.  He was most recently based in Switzerland as a Distinguished Engineer and a member of the IBM Academy of Technology. Previously, he led the networking group at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, in Geneva, Switzerland, from 1985 to 1996. This followed ten years' experience in software for process control systems at CERN, interrupted by three years teaching computer science at Massey University in New Zealand. He holds a first degree in physics and a Ph.D. in computer science, and is a Chartered Engineer (UK). He has been an active participant in the Global Grid Forum, and in the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), where he has worked on IPv6 and on Differentiated Services. He served from March 1994 to March 2002 on the Internet Architecture Board, which he chaired for five years. He also served as a Trustee of the Internet Society, and was Chairman of its Board of Trustees for two years until June 2002. He was Chair of the IETF from March 2005 to March 2007.

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Rapid IPv6 Deployment for Small-Medium ISP Networks

Skeeve Stevens - CEO / Technical Director, eintellego Pty Ltd

Kurt Bales - Operations Manager, eintellego Pty Ltd

Abstract:

In 2009 so far, eintellego have been involved in transforming the core networks of half a dozen ISP and content provider networks. Hear about the challenges and their methods for getting their customer networks ready for IPv6 and the experiences in educating management and technical staff with what they need to know about what is to come.

Bio:

Skeeve Stevens has spent the last 15 years designing, building and managing small to medium ISP networks. The last three years he has been the CEO and Technical Director of eintellego, a network consultancy specialising in ISP and ISP-like networks. A highlight in 2008 was when eintellego supplied, built and managed the entire World Youth Day 2008 network which serviced thousands of staff and media 24/7 at all major venues.

eintellego has spent much of 2009 working on IPv6 deployments and developing methods to help its ISP and corporate customers get ready for the future with IPv6. Skeeve Stevens is passionate about Internet policy and Internet development in the Asia Pacific Region.

Kurt Bales has been working as a Network Consultant for the past 10 years, and spent 2 years working as the Network Operations Manager for a Wireless ISP that covered regional Australia throughout QLD, NSW, VIC and SA. Currently he is the Operations Manager (Networks) for eintellego Pty Ltd, where he is responsible for maintaining the networks for several ISPs and Content Providers, as well as several NGO and corporate customers. Kurt is also the lead engineer and Operations Manager for NOCNOC (www.nocnoc.net.au) which specialises in management, maintaining and monitoring CPE for Small Businesses and Prosumers.

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Panel Discussion

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Friday 29 January
Speaker

Lightning talks

Geoff Huston - Protocol mash-up
Olof Kasselstrand - IXs
Barry Brailey - CCIP
Richard Wade - Cloud Computing
Simon Blake - Mystery topic #3
Llyod - VUW/IRD
Nathan Ward - Mystery topic #27
Dean Pemberton - IPv6 task force


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Building a data centre for under $1m

Gerard Creamer - Managing Director, Netspace Services Ltd

Abstract:

Building a data centre is a big job. Follow our two year journey from finding the ideal site to discovering process coolers in a bicycle warehouse... When it's your own money the road is both educational and freightening.

Bio:

Gerard has been doing web things since 1996, initially on the pretty pictures side of things.  Since 1999 he has been working in hosting and networking, primarily for the finance sector.  

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Signing the root

Joe Abley - Director DNS Group, ICANN

Abstract:

Deployment of DNS Security Extensions (DNSSEC) in the Root Zone of the Domain Name System (DNS) is proceeding on a draft timeline from 1 December 2009 with expected full deployment on 1 July 2010. This work represents a significant structural change in the DNS and as such is expected to have operational impact. This presentation will provide an overview of the project and will describe progress to date. Feedback from operators in New Zealand will be fed back into the ongoing deployment.

Bio:

Joe joined ICANN in 2009. He provides direction and management for ICANN's production DNS services, including the L Root Nameserver.  Joe engages in technical community outreach through regional operator meetings, and is an active contributor to the IETF.  Before joining ICANN, Joe held technical operations and architecture roles for TekSavvy, Afilias, ISC and AboveNet.



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ENUM, potentially

Jay Daley - Chief Executive, .nz Registry Services

Abstract:

ENUM is a technology that puts telephone numbers into DNS and so enables the location of a VoIP server in much the same way DNS is used to locate email servers.  It is already in extensive use inside telcos but still is not available to the public in NZ.  This talk will explain, why we need it, how it works and how it fits into the strategies of telcos.

Bio:

Jay Daley is the Chief Executive of .nz Registry Services, the operator of .nz and a wholly owned subsidiary of InternetNZ, the membership society for those that care about the Internet in NZ.  Jay was previously the CTO with .uk, where he was responsible for implementing ENUM for the +44 country code.

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DITL - A Day in The Life of the Internet experiment

Sebastian Castro - DNS Specialist, .nz Registry Services

Abstract:

The DITL project is the largest simultaneous collection of full-payload packet traces from a core component of the global Internet infrastructure. This presentation focuses on analyzing the data collected at the DNS root servers, covering from January 2006 to March 2009, exploring trends and interesting fact about the traffic observed on this key piece of the Global Internet.

Bio:

Sebastian Castro has been recently appointed as DNS Specialist working for .nz Registry Services. Before that, he worked as DNS Analyst for CAIDA in charge of the DITL data analysis.

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Internet NZ update

Jordan Carter - Policy Director, Internet NZ

Abstract: 

InternetNZ will update NZNOG with its work plan for 2010, and talk through some of the key issues that are under way now. Copyright, ACTA, Filtering, IPv6, the government's Fibre plans and more.

Bio:

Jordan Carter is InternetNZ's policy director, and has managed the organisation's public policy work since 2007.

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Regional Internet Registry Update

Elly Tawhai - Senior Internet Resource Analyst, APNIC

Abstract:

Elly will provide an update on what's happening within APNIC and the other four RIRs, including an APNIC policy-sig update.

Bio:

For the past eight years Elly has been working at APNIC as an Internet Resource Analyst. She also co-ordinates APNIC's liaison activities within the Pacific, New Zealand and Australia.  Elly is one of the longest serving employees of APNIC having started in September 2000.  Elly is a Senior Internet Resource Analyst for APNIC.  She also acts as the Liaison Officer of APNIC to members and stakeholders in the Pacific region and an associate trainer supporting the APNIC training team.

She is responsible for working with resource holders to process resource allocation requests, which is the core operation of APNIC.  As a senior internet resource analyst her role extends to evaluating and analysing network plans from members and the community and making appropriate decisions for the distribution of the Internet resources throughout the region.  In her liaison role, Elly uses knowledge of the pacific region, networking with existing members, seeking liaison opportunities with potential members and actively participating in Liaison events. She is also occasionally required to work closely with the training team to conduct training within the region.

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RIPE Labs - Tools and News for Operators

George Michaelson - Senior Research and Development Officer, APNIC (speaking on behalf of RIPE NCC).

Abstract:

RIPE Labs is a new platform designed by the RIPE NCC for network operators, developers and industry experts to expose, test and discuss innovative Internet-related tools, ideas and analysis that can benefit the RIPE community and the broader technology world.

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IPv6 flow chart

Nathan Ward - Consultant, Braintrust

Abstract:

Late last decade I presented the first cut of a flow chart which simplifies some of the architecture decisions when rolling out IPv6. It's a simpler way for newcomers to approach the problem of IPv6 deployment - the alternative is to become an expert in all the technologies so a choice can be made. I will present a new and improved version of this flowchart, and show how to implement each solution in things you can go home and do today, or tomorrow, or whenever your hangover wears off.

Bio:

Nathan Ward is a consultant with Braintrust - a networking and systems consultancy and services company with a current focus on IPv6. He has worked in the NZ Internet and IT industry for a number of years, working for several NZ ISPs, one NZ telco by proxy, and one NZ network security box vendor. He has also done some time with a couple of small ISPs and VoIP providers in Africa.  He is active in the IPv6 community speaking at conferences and meetings in various parts of the world, and has been using IPv6 in anger for 6 or so years. 

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Andy Linton

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More bits for less bucks - metro WDM for the fiscally prudent

Simon Blake - CTO, CityLink

Abstract:

While dark fibre is increasingly available, it still comes at a cost premium - there are incentives to squeeze as much as we can from the glass.  Coloured optical equipment has continued to drop in price, so lashing up your own wavelengths has never been more feasible.  This presentation will discuss some of the options, and our experiences implementing metro WDM at Citylink.

Bio:

Simon Blake has been CTO at Citylink, like, forever.

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Monkeying Around on the APE

Mike Jager - Senior Network Engineer, Web Drive

Abstract:

IXPs are generally a cost effective way of keeping local traffic local. For about the cost of a good night at the pub, IXPs can also get you layer 2 adjacent to a significant number of ISP routers for fun and profit. Sometimes those routers do things that you might not expect, and sometimes they do things that you probably don't want them to be doing. A presentation of what you can (and I did) get up to on IXPs.

Bio:

Mike is a Senior Network Engineer at Web Drive, and since his arrival there in 2004 has helped it grow to be one of New Zealand's largest hosting providers. Mike obtained a BE from Auckland. Currently, he herds packets, mutters at clouds, plays Postman Pat, and sneaks up on web applications, tricking them into scaling horizontally when they least expect it.

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Conference Closing

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